Podiatry Glossary

A GLOSSARY OF THERAPUTIC FARRIERY TERMS

S. E. O’GRADY*, A. H. PARKS†, R. F. REDDEN‡ AND T. A. TURNER§

Northern Virginia Equine, 8170 Patrickswell Lane, Marshall, Virginia 20115; †University of Georgia, College of Veterinary Medicine, Athens, Georgia 30602; ‡International Equine Podiatry Center, PO Box 507, Versailles, Kentucky 40386; and §Anoka Equine Hospital,16645 70th St NE, Elks River, Minnesota 55330, USA.

Reprinted with permission of the American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP)
Original published in Equine Veterinary Education, Vol. 19, June 2007

 

INTRODUCTION
The importance of Theraputic Farriery as a part of equine veterinary practice is well recognised. Cooperation and the symbiotic relationship between the veterinary and farrier professions continue to grow and improve. Historically, there has not been a standardisation of Theraputic Farriery terms that can be used for communication, both verbal and written, between veterinarians, farriers and horse owners. Furthermore, a uniform list of Theraputic Farriery terms should benefit veterinarians and farriers in their record keeping and help augment their written reports. Authors writing in veterinary and farrier journals should be encouraged to adhere to recognised terms and to qualify their descriptions wherever possible. The authors of this article have attempted to create a glossary of Theraputic Farriery terms that will form the basis for a common language related to the equine foot. This glossary provides an accurate basis of Theraputic Farriery terms that, with revisions and additions, will continue to evolve in the future.

 

The specialised terminology found in equine Theraputic Farriery should be used to keep records for both veterinarians and farriers. It can be used to verbally communicate on a day-to-day basis, to express ideas informally in personal written communication, and to express ideas formally in the literature. As such, it is obvious that it is most important that the meaning of language used in the practice of Theraputic Farriery be clear and unambiguous. This language is often based on colloquial jargon. Words often arise to fill a conceptual void, either perceived or real, and the meaning of words may change. However, it is important that language used in the literature is consistent, precise and preferably as closely related as possible to the currently accepted norm.


The terms described in this glossary refer to various areas including the gross anatomic morphology of the foot, the shape or conformation of the foot, the function of the foot, and pathological changes associated with diseases of the foot. This glossary is inevitably incomplete. It is our intention that this should be a dynamic document to which new terms will be added, inaccurate terms clarified and colloquial words and expressions deprecated in favour of more scientifically rigorous terms.

The specialised terminology found in equine Theraputic Farriery should be used to keep records for both veterinarians and farriers. It can be used to verbally communicate on a day-to-day basis, to express ideas informally in personal written communication, and to express ideas formally in the literature. As such, it is obvious that it is most important that the meaning of language used in the practice of Theraputic Farriery be clear and unambiguous. This language is often based on colloquial jargon. Words often arise to fill a conceptual void, either perceived or real, and the meaning of words may change. However, it is important that language used in the literature is consistent, precise and preferably as closely related as possible to the currently accepted norm.


The terms described in this glossary refer to various areas including the gross anatomic morphology of the foot, the shape or conformation of the foot, the function of the foot, and pathological changes associated with diseases of the foot. This glossary is inevitably incomplete. It is our intention that this should be a dynamic document to which new terms will be added, inaccurate terms clarified and colloquial words and expressions deprecated in favour of more scientifically rigorous terms.

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